Forum

Tom’s Bucket Of Mud — Paro. sp. ‘sentang’

More
9 years 2 weeks ago #588 by Lis­beth
This is the coolest aquar­ium I’ve seen in a long time! But how does it work for Paros with­out cover glass? Is the air warm enough (ore humid enough?) On the surface?

Please Log in or Cre­ate an account to join the conversation.

  • Peter Finke
  • Peter Finke's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Banned
  • Banned
  • pub­lic under­stand­ing of science“
More
9 years 2 weeks ago 9 years 2 weeks ago #590 by Peter Finke
Lis­beth, licorice gouramis have no spe­cial rela­tions to the water sur­face. In nature, they live mostly in deeper regions (around one meter). They own a per­fect labyrinth but the do not use it for the most time because the live in run­ning waters not brightly lighted (below the shad­ing cover of tops of the rainforest’s trees). There­fore oxy­gen is no prob­lem. Even in the aquar­ium they don’t use their labyrinth nor­mally; Foer­sch pre­cluded the sur­face by a cover of glass and the fish showed no sign of dis­com­fort over weeks; they never wanted to fetch atmos­pheric air. This is the same what we observe. Only in stress sit­u­a­tions they could be forced to use their labyrinth, and then they do it. But again, they with­draw from the sur­face very quickly. There­fore, you can­not com­pare them to other labyrinths that are fish bound to the water-​surface. Paros are not.
An that is the rea­son, too, why they nearly never leap. I never lost a Paro by leap­ing out of the water. If the milieu is right they live near the bot­tom or in the mid­dle of the water near their small caves but sel­dom at the sur­face. And remem­ber: Most of the nat­ural caves are old leaves on the ground or some­where between plants in the mid­dle of the water. They actively avoid the sur­face. Maybe they have an innate idea of a king­fisher or a heron. For a Paro’s male acci­den­tally hit by a sun­beam that pen­e­trated the foliage of the rain­for­est will brightly reflect it by the phos­pho­res­cence of its finnage. Good for bird, bad for fish. So the fish have acco­mo­dated to that.
Last edit: 9 years 2 weeks ago by Peter Finke.

Please Log in or Cre­ate an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 weeks ago #591 by Lis­beth
Of course, I never thought of that before, that my paros never actu­ally go up to the sur­face! A lit­tle embar­rassed here now :)

Thanks for a good answer!

Please Log in or Cre­ate an account to join the conversation.

  • Big­Tom
  • BigTom's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Senior Boarder
  • Senior Boarder
More
8 years 10 months ago #685 by Big­Tom
Well, the tank is now roughly a year old, still hap­pily more or less self sus­tain­ing and has turned into an absolute jun­gle. I’m quite happy to leave it do it’s thing really, so every­thing is pretty messy, but some pics -








In the process of set­ting up a seper­ate spawn­ing tank for the Paros, so hope­fully there’ll be some news there in the com­ing weeks.

Please Log in or Cre­ate an account to join the conversation.

  • Big­Tom
  • BigTom's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Senior Boarder
  • Senior Boarder
More
8 years 10 months ago #686 by Big­Tom
A few thoughts a year in… For starters the tran­si­tion between under­wa­ter and immersed growth is a bit weak, they do still look like plants in pots stuck to the side… I’m plan­ning a major rescape some­time in the next month in order to build a proper island for the plants to grow on, and to remove a rock that I think is adding to the water hard­ness.

I am also tak­ing the risk of grad­u­ally low­er­ing the water hard­ness through water changes. This might upset the plants a bit and reduce the sta­bil­ity of the water para­me­ters, but I do feel the need to bring the con­di­tions closer in line to what the fish in the tank pre­fer. I think as long as I do things grad­u­ally (as with every­thing in this tank!) then it should be OK.

The alter­na­tive would be to move the Paros and Boraras across to the new nano cubes, but there’s no way I could keep them in a self-​sustaining fash­ion by doing that. I really hope to be able to get the Paros breed­ing one way or another, as oth­er­wise all I’m doing is con­tribut­ing to the con­sump­tion of an endan­gered species.

I think the other impor­tant thing to high­light is how slow the devel­op­ment of this tank has been… it’s taken a year to get to the point that a high tech solu­tion would reach in a mat­ter of weeks (plant growth wise). How­ever, the upside of this is that things in the tank really are start­ing to look prop­erly wild… I’ve got mosses that I never even knew were in the tank creep­ing across wood and stone, and the mulm has just reached the point where my hydro­cotyles are throw­ing out roots for the first time, instead of just spread­ing with run­ners. The whole ecosys­tem is still not in bal­ance after a year — the last 2 weeks have seen an explo­sion in the Hyella azteca pop­u­la­tion that I thought had died out com­pletely when I added them way back in the sum­mer.

It’s not a style of tank for the impa­tient, and even I some­times strug­gle to resist the urge to mess around with it or (hard­est of all), not chuck an extra hun­dred fish in!

Please Log in or Cre­ate an account to join the conversation.

  • Peter Finke
  • Peter Finke's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Banned
  • Banned
  • pub­lic under­stand­ing of science“
More
8 years 10 months ago 8 years 10 months ago #687 by Peter Finke
Big Tom, it’s a fine thing that you let us par­tic­i­pate in your thoughts, accom­pa­nied by those jungle-​like pic­tures. I am well on your side when you oppose your way of keep­ing a beau­ti­ful aquar­ium to the usual high-​tech type, and I can under­stand very well the prob­lem of bring­ing the needs of the plants into a bal­ance with the needs of the fish. In stan­dard aquaria this is much less a prob­lem because you are using tap water with a higher degree of solved min­er­als and a pH not nec­es­sar­ily as low as it is needed for Parosphromenus. You can use stronger light­ing and feed the plants with spe­cial nutri­ents. All that is nearly for­bid­den if keep­ing (and per­haps) breed­ing black-​water fish prop­erly, since the activ­ity of the plants would be much too high and the water con­di­tions would become rather insta­bile. So your tank is not only aes­thet­i­cally won­der­ful but also a valu­able test type of a low tech tank for fish which can­not stand the usual high tech con­di­tions. But is nev­er­the­less a dream land­scape of an under­wa­ter jun­gle.
We wait and see in which direc­tion it will develop. And it’s a good idea to estab­lish some small tanks addi­tion­ally for breed­ing that fish. One could not exclude the pos­si­bil­ity of one or another young that sur­vives in that big tank, if the water is not too hard. The eggs of the Parosphromenus are very del­i­cate and don’t stand an osmotic pres­sure that is too high for them. But maybe the water val­ues are just at the bor­der of accept­abil­ity, and then there might be some suprises nevertheless.
Last edit: 8 years 10 months ago by Peter Finke.

Please Log in or Cre­ate an account to join the conversation.

Mod­er­a­tors: helene
Time to cre­ate page: 0.131 seconds
X

Right Click is Disabled

Please respect our image usage rights and do not copy the images found on this web­site with­out prior per­mis­sion. Thank You — The Parosphromenus Project Staff